Biofilm–What Is It and Why you should care

It was the end of a long day and I was deeply immersed in my nightly bedtime ritual of brushing, flossing, and getting ready for some badly needed sleep. My Troop of Chore Police (my doggies) came in and informed me that I had forgotten something very important–I had forgotten to check their water.  As I grabbed the water bowl, my thumb noticed a film on the inside of the bowl.

“Ewww! Gross! And there are floaters in the water too!” I said to the Chore Police.

At that moment, my thought bubble popped out of my head.  thoughtbubble1

What is the slime? It is known as a biofilm.  I will quote the definition given by Colgate at www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-eduction/articles/whati-is-biofilm:

Biofilms form when bacteria adhere to surfaces in some form of watery environment and begin to excrete a slimy, gluelike substance that can stick to all kinds of materials–metals, plastics, soil particles, medical implant materials, biological tissues. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial species, but biofilms more often consist of many species of bacteria, as well as fungi, algae, protozoa, debris, and corrosion products. Essentially, a biofilm may form on any surface exposed to bacteria and some amount of water.1

So that is the long definition of biofilm. How does this affect you, the person reading a dental blog? I want you to think in terms of this–biofilm=plaque.  Plaque is our nemesis in the dental office.  We know that plaque (biofilms) do bad things when they are allowed to hang out in your mouth. When you see your dentist or dental hygienist for your evaluations, you probably have been nagged, excuse me-I mean instructed, by your dental professional to use a toothbrush and floss at least once a day to keep your teeth and gums healthy.  Is that verbal instruction from a professional enough to keep you motivated? Probably not, since most people do not floss on a daily basis or even on an every other day basis.

For those of you that require a little more motivation let me introduce to you a video. This video is especially good for those visual learners. There is no distraction from sound or color-just the facts. It is about 2 minutes long and shows the bacterial growth in 24 hours. These bacteria are not actors, they are the same types of bacteria growing and flourishing in your mouth right now. If you want to skip to the last 15 seconds, that’s fine. The end shows how much the bacteria colony has grown in 23-24 hours. Yuck!!

Okay, so I hope I have moved you to want to take action. What can you do?

  • Brush daily. I suggest brushing at least twice a day using an ultrasonic toothbrush. The action of brushing mechanically breaks up the protective slime barrier and helps to obliterate the colony. An ultrasonic toothbrush, such as Sonicare or Oral-B, utilizes ultrasonic vibration and mechanical means to disrupt the bacteria.
  • Floss at least once a day. Flossing is an important tool used to reach areas between the teeth and below the gumline. Brushing alone is inadequate in these areas to break up the bacteria. Flossing is another mechanical means of breaking up the bacterial colony.
  • Brush your removable dental appliance. If you are wearing some sort of removable dental appliance such as a full denture, a partial denture, a mouthguard or nightguard, you will want to use a soft toothbrush on a daily basis to clean the surfaces. These appliances build up the same biofilm and can cause problems if left to multiply.
  • Check your denture or partial dentures for wear and report to your dentist. Cracks, rough areas, and peeling of your dental appliance will give the bacteria a place to hide and multiply.

The decision is yours.

Are you willing to let the biofilm have a place to live and thrive in your mouth by giving them a safe place to stay, allowing them to eat what you eat, and possibly taking over your dental and all-over health by their increasing numbers and by-products? Or do you become your own Chore Police and train yourself to spend a few extra minutes per day to brush and floss so that bacteria isn’t allowed to run rampant in your mouth and become a sticky, slimy biofilm?

Be your own Super Hero!!

Have a great week and remember that KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!

Your comments are appreciated and read by the author. Your idea could be our next blog topic.

Advertisements

Happy Smile, Healthy Smile

As you may have noticed, I tend to use my own dental experiences in writing this blog. Write what you know about, right? Well, this morning while enjoying my morning tea, one thought that popped to mind was that it was time to touch up my whitening. I’m sure for most of you that would not be the thought that breaks up that beautiful moment when your first caffeine hit of the day takes place. So why is touching up my whitening such a big deal? Mainly because I want to put my best smile forward from the moment I step into my office. I think of myself as a reflection of what is possible for everyone-a happy, healthy smile.

Have you thought about whitening your teeth?
How can I assist you today?

I will admit that I work really hard and have made a real investment in my keeping my teeth healthy. I do the daily flossing thing, well, except on the weekends. My toothbrush of choice is a Sonicare, because I find that it delivers what I paid for it to do-removes the plaque and stain from my teeth. The tongue scraper I have is used every time I brush my teeth, which is at least twice a day. My daily investment of time pays off when I put my lipstick on and smile in the mirror. Or when I see my dentist for my recall and evaluation.  But what about the financial investment? Just like you, I have invested many $$ over time for my healthy smile and I haven’t regretted one cent of it.

Keep you mouth healthy by investing in your oral health.
Keep you mouth healthy by investing in your oral health.

Since I use myself as a demo on this blog, I have had a chance to REALLY see my investment in pictures. I have a couple of crowns to protect my fractured teeth from the massive chewing forces I put on them when I chew gum and eat Lemonheads (Shhh, don’t tell my dentist). I have several fillings-more than several, really-I have lots of fillings throughout my mouth. I have even paid to wear braces for a few years, which I paid for out-of-pocket, because my dental insurance did not have orthodontic coverage for someone my age. Oh yeah, and let’s not forget the Waterpik I used while in my braces to ensure I didn’t get areas of discolored decalcification after those braces came off.

All that said, I can remember a time when I would not smile because I was embarrassed of  my smile. I would hold my hand over my mouth when I smiled or laughed. Sad, huh? For many years I tried to hide the one thing that universally is a sign of happiness-a smile. This shame was due in part to the dentist that degraded me as a child because of my inadequate brushing habits. He did not take the time to ask how I was brushing then correct my behavior. He didn’t even ask if anyone was helping me to brush. He did let me know, in no uncertain terms, that he was very disappointed in my mouth. I was a little older the first time I went to a dentist, so this little kid at the time was appalled!  His chairside manner was atrocious!   I felt so bad about myself and not just about how dirty my teeth were at the time. This embarrassment carried over to my adulthood.

I’m so glad that we have such a wide variety of dental professionals to choose from today. We don’t have to endure the bad treatment from our dental teams as I did back then (in the old days). I am willing to investment in myself, both time and money, to avoid the pain and humiliation I felt all those years ago. I understand the fears and concerns our patients have when they walk into our office. BELIEVE ME, I understand and want to help others get to a place where they are able to enjoy a happy, healthy smile.

Share you smile with others.
Share you smile with others.

Keep Brushing!

http://www.edmonddds.com